Business Strategy

/Business Strategy
2 07, 2014

Challenge Your Thinking. Focus Your Execution. Deliver Your Results.

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:27+00:00 July 2nd, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

The walls of The Loomis Agency are adorned with pictures of dogs. There are so many photos and references to our beloved canine companions that conspiracy theorists might wonder if the company is secretly reviving the Egyptian practice of animal worship. Michael Tuggle, Chief Imagination Officer for the Agency, told [...]

17 06, 2014

The Fault in Our Institutions is the Fault Within Ourselves

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:28+00:00 June 17th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |1 Comment

The lack of confidence in the institutions that define our collective culture is threatening the civility, economic prosperity, and standing of the United States as a world leader. Let’s start with the government. The President’s approval rating is underwater and continuing to sink. A recent Gallup poll found that only [...]

2 06, 2014

Are You a Challenger Brand?

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:29+00:00 June 2nd, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

There’s a quote about leaders and followers that suggests “If you’re not the lead dog, the view never changes.” For many brands, that’s certainly true. We all understand there are a limited number of spots at the top and that in each category, there can only be one market leader. It’s also true that most brands will never even sniff the position at the front of their respective pack. But that doesn’t mean you have to resign yourself, or your brand to follower status. Whether you’re in second place, third place, or last place, by adopting a challenger brand mentality and embracing three distinct “states,” you can step out of your role of follower and start creating a whole new view.

29 05, 2014

Jack Be Nimble: Sure, but how?

By | 2014-10-20T16:56:01+00:00 May 29th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

This would have been the message if the speaker at your last business meeting presented in nursery rhymes: Jack be nimble. Jack be quick. Jack jump over The candle stick. You feel better, right? You now know what is expected of you and the definition of success. And, you have no real context for why it is important or idea about how to move forward.

19 05, 2014

Break the S-R Loop to Make Change Work

By | 2014-10-20T20:03:28+00:00 May 19th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

We taught mice and pigeons to do all sorts of interesting things during my graduate school class in behavioral psychology. The principle is simple: provide a stimulus and elicit a response. The stimulus-response cycle still plays an important role in animal training today. And, it is evident in virtually every routine action we take. You don’t think about your response; you just make it. And at some point, it becomes automatic. On most days, those automatic responses are benign routines that allow you to effectively navigate. Unfortunately, they can also become anchors that prevent you from making a change that will transform your business and your life.

4 05, 2014

Should You Put Lipstick on the Brussels Sprouts? How Leaders Communicate Forced Change

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:30+00:00 May 4th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

My presentations about leading change usually include a story about Double Stuf Oreos and Brussels Sprouts. You can view the story here, but the basic principle is simple: A child will willingly change what they are doing to reach a jar of cookies on top of your refrigerator. You seldom see them act with the same sense of urgency to acquire Brussels sprouts. With that in mind, leaders generate creative tension when the vision they create for change is compelling – like cookies – rather than boring like vegetables.

20 04, 2014

Generating Urgency: What’s Keeping You from Changing?

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:30+00:00 April 20th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |2 Comments

The willingness and urgency to change are based on emotional readiness not intellectual understanding. If intellectual understanding – knowing what we should do – was all it took to change, the gap between realizing we need to do something different and the work of implementing that change would be non-existent. But that’s not how it works.

21 03, 2014

Why You Will Lose Your Best Employees

By | 2014-10-20T19:56:41+00:00 March 21st, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Your best employees are contemplating quitting. Some of them already have – even though they are still on the job. Hiring is picking up – especially for the stars who more than compensate for their cost with superior performance. Your best employees will have the opportunity to leave. Are you vulnerable for an exodus? Chances are the answer is yes if you are guilty of any of the following:

17 03, 2014

10 Words Entrepreneurs Should Use Every Day

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:36+00:00 March 17th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |4 Comments

Jay Goltz writes a blog on small business and entrepreneurship for the New York Times. His March 10, 2014 posting was titled “10 Words Entrepreneurs Should Use With Caution.” In that piece, Goltz shared 10 words that he believes have become jargon in the world of entrepreneurship.  They are: Passion [...]

11 03, 2014

Inside the House of Lies: Why Large Consulting Firms Are Often Bad at Change

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:36+00:00 March 11th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |3 Comments

I received this email last week. The author’s name has been withheld in order to protect his/her job: “I read your book Make Change Work. and it made me angry. What made me angry is the fact that I work as a management consultant for one of the largest consulting firms and I am ashamed how few (if any) of the wisdoms we actually take from your book and coach our clients accordingly. Very often, we are in gross ignorance of the very valid insights and tips you have in your little book.”