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21 09, 2014

Leading Change Isn’t About the Model

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:24+00:00 September 21st, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

There is no shortage of change models being pushed by authors and consultants. Each claims their supporters and detractors. I have one as well. It is the latest iteration of a model I developed and began using and presenting in 1989. Twice in the past two weeks perspective clients have [...]

10 08, 2014

What is the ONE thing you would do to fix the economy?

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:25+00:00 August 10th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Five award-winning authors and speakers who just happen to be great friends get together to address important questions facing business, the country, and individual success. They answer this question in this edition: What ONE thing would you do to fix the economy? Be ready to be challenged.

20 07, 2014

What’s in a Name Change? Part III

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:26+00:00 July 20th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |2 Comments

The first two parts of this blog series dealt with what went wrong when the National Speakers Association announced a name change and re-branding effort at its annual convention on July 2. Today we look at what went right.

13 07, 2014

What’s in a Name Change? Part II

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:27+00:00 July 13th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |6 Comments

Napoleon said, “A leader is a dealer in hope.” When it comes to change, that responsibility extends to creating the context of why and how the current reality should and could be different.

8 07, 2014

What’s in a Name Change? Part I

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:27+00:00 July 8th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |4 Comments

The majority of the world spent the last five days living their life. A small slice of the universe who make their living selling ideas, however, were agitating themselves into a frenzy. In case you missed it, the National Speakers Association, an association of which I am a member, decided to re-brand itself and change its name to PLATFORM. This is a first world problem. In the context of all of the turmoil in the world, the re-naming of this 41-year old association ranks right up there with … well almost nothing. And yet, people on all sides of the argument lit up the blogosphere and social media channels supporting their positions … even if it meant refusing to consider that others might be equally right in their own stance (see my blog on “Is It Always Right to be Right” for more on that phenomenon.)

17 06, 2014

The Fault in Our Institutions is the Fault Within Ourselves

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:28+00:00 June 17th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |1 Comment

The lack of confidence in the institutions that define our collective culture is threatening the civility, economic prosperity, and standing of the United States as a world leader. Let’s start with the government. The President’s approval rating is underwater and continuing to sink. A recent Gallup poll found that only [...]

12 06, 2014

Is It Always Right to Be Right?

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:28+00:00 June 12th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |4 Comments

The 1971 Oscar in the Short Film, Cartoon category went to a piece titled “Is It Always Right To Be Right.” It was directed by Lee Mishkin, narrated by Orson Welles, and written by Warren Schmidt. The opening words of the film are: There once was a land where people were always right. They knew they were right and they were proud of it. It was a land where people stated with confidence, "I am right and you are wrong." These were words of conviction, courage, strength, and moral certainty. In this fictional land, any attempt at cooperation and understanding were viewed as cowardice and weakness. Everyone was so convinced of their rightness that no one dared to utter words such as, “You may be right” or “I may be wrong.”

13 05, 2014

Focus on What Truly Matters

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:29+00:00 May 13th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

These days it seems that we’re all so busy, overcommitted, and information-obsessed. Our never-ending to-do lists are long and we run around trying to “keep up” or “be important,” and in the process stress ourselves out. Unfortunately, it often takes something bad to happen to slow us down, wake us up, and force us to focus on what truly matters most in life.

4 05, 2014

Should You Put Lipstick on the Brussels Sprouts? How Leaders Communicate Forced Change

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:30+00:00 May 4th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

My presentations about leading change usually include a story about Double Stuf Oreos and Brussels Sprouts. You can view the story here, but the basic principle is simple: A child will willingly change what they are doing to reach a jar of cookies on top of your refrigerator. You seldom see them act with the same sense of urgency to acquire Brussels sprouts. With that in mind, leaders generate creative tension when the vision they create for change is compelling – like cookies – rather than boring like vegetables.

27 04, 2014

Defining Integrity: How Leaders Earn Trust & Respect

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:30+00:00 April 27th, 2014|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

How do you define integrity? Is there an absolute definition? Or, do you find yourself quoting the phrase made famous by Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart: “I know it when I see it”? We know that it appears at or near the top of every list of desirable leadership traits. It is the essential ingredient for building and sustaining trust with others. Go ahead—take a stab at it. Integrity is . . . It is more difficult to define integrity than you thought, isn’t it?