Integrity & Ethics

/Integrity & Ethics
14 Oct, 2012

The Exploitation of Honey Boo Boo

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:47+00:00 October 14th, 2012|Accountability, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Personal Development|

What would you do to secure your 15 minutes of fame? How about to increase your financial well-being? Would you exploit your child on national television? Would you reinforce and applaud behavior that is likely to create lifetime problems for your child? Would you become the family that everyone loves to ridicule? For the parents of Honey Boo Boo, the uber-precocious child with her own show airing on TLC, the answer is yes and a lot more.

7 Oct, 2012

What Is Your Key Question?

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:47+00:00 October 7th, 2012|Accountability, Business Growth, Business Strategy, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Personal Development, Results|

The "Weeds" series finale on the Showtime network left a lot of people disappointed. I was one of them until it hit me: The entire ending was about Nancy Botwin’s key question. What is your key question? Embracing your question provides the measuring stick for your success. It lights the path toward the results you need to achieve in order to be fulfilled. And, it defines what it means to be significant and contribute.

16 Sep, 2012

If They Don’t Trust You

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:48+00:00 September 16th, 2012|Accountability, Business Strategy, Corporate Culture, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Results|

Two incidents occurred in the past week that reinforces a critical factor in every leader’s effectiveness: The impact of mistrust. Both incidents prove this truth about the ability to influence others: If they don’t trust you, everything you say will be twisted against you and nothing you say will be given the benefit of the doubt.

31 Aug, 2012

The Presidential Election & Defining Integrity

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:48+00:00 August 31st, 2012|Accountability, Communication, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership|

There are several guarantees in the campaign for President of the United States: • The other side – regardless of the side you are on – will be portrayed by their opponents as completely out of touch with the “average” American • Every candidate will make promises that can only be kept with the cooperation of Congress, and every candidate will pledge to work with their opponents across the isle • Personal attacks will be plentiful and usually cloaked in an argument about policy implications • The choice between candidates will always be framed as two distinct visions that will determine the destiny and fate of the country • Integrity – or specifically the lack of it – will be called into question by the candidates, their surrogates, and the media pundits There is little any of us can do to change the first four items on this list. They are going to happen regardless of any efforts to restore civility and common sense to the campaign.

1 Jul, 2012

Delcare Independence from Fear and Uncertainty

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:49+00:00 July 1st, 2012|Accountability, Business Strategy, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Others, Performance Improvement, Personal Development, Results|

We live in an era of unprecedented uncertainty. At least that is what we are led to believe. Yes, the economy is sputtering at best. Jobs are at risk or non-existent. Europe could implode financially. The Middle East could implode politically. Depending on your political views, either the left or the right is about to take the country over a cliff from which there is no return. The challenges we face are certainly more expansive in their scope, but unprecedented uncertainty? Hardly. Do you believe that the level of personal anxiety is any higher today than that which existed during the Cuban Missile Crisis; World War I or II; the Civil War; the Great Depression; or life in the American colonies during the Revolutionary War?

22 Mar, 2012

Are Your Ethics For Sale Now That Times are Good?

By | 2014-10-19T22:23:53+00:00 March 22nd, 2012|Business Strategy, Corporate Culture, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Personal Development|

The Ethics Resource Center (www.ethics.org) released its latest National Business Ethics Survey results in January 2012. There is good news and bad news. The good news is that overall reports of misconduct are at historic lows and those who observe ethical misconduct are more willing to report it than in past years.

30 Jan, 2012

Mitt, Newt, and Leadership Lessons from the Campaign

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:51+00:00 January 30th, 2012|Business Presentations, Business Strategy, Communication, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Leadership Development|

So what have we learned after nine months of almost continuous campaigning; over twenty debates; and three different contests (with a fourth coming soon)? If you are a leader, the on-going battle between Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich offers two important lessons about selling yourself and your ideas.

23 Dec, 2011

Act Now To Earn Trust

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:51+00:00 December 23rd, 2011|Accountability, Business Strategy, Communication, Corporate Culture, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Personal Development|

People trust you, right? Most people won’t look you in the eye and say, “I don’t trust you.” That is especially true if you are in a position of power. But, the symptoms of mistrust are there. It is up to us to see them. You could be experiencing a lack of trust if you are seeing any of the following:

22 Nov, 2011

Leadership and the Occupation

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:52+00:00 November 22nd, 2011|Accountability, Communication, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Results|

Two months and counting. Truthfully, did you believe that the Occupy movement would have lasted this long? Protests happen all the time in this country. Travel to Washington, DC on virtually any day and you will see some group making their presence felt and beliefs known. The freedom to assemble and communicate your opinion is a sacred right in our country that was founded on a protest movement. And yet, we haven’t seen a movement like since … last year if you understand that the Occupy movement – while different in its goals – was born out of a frustration that shares striking similarities to the Tea Party. So what can leaders learn from a movement that has captured the news and proven to be more than just a group of people gathering to share their dissatisfaction? Here are four lessons:

6 Sep, 2011

Want Growth? Part I: Start With Trust

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:53+00:00 September 6th, 2011|Business Growth, Business Strategy, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Personal Development|

The U.S. economy is in a self-fulfilling death spiral propelled by mistrust. There is a good chance that the same thing can be said of your industry, your employer, and your career. Growth requires investment, and that requires confidence. You can’t cut your way to sustainable growth. When trust is absent, people naturally protect their immediate self-interest. This will occur even if it leads to their long-term individual and collective undoing.

23 Aug, 2011

Town Halls & Buses & Fairs … Oh My!

By | 2014-10-19T22:34:51+00:00 August 23rd, 2011|Accountability, Business Strategy, Corporate Culture, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Personal Development|

Someone recently asked me why I use so many examples from political leaders when discussing effective leadership. Isn’t it obvious? Every week elected leaders and candidates give us something that is simply too good to ignore. This week’s example is the brou ha ha over President Obama’s bus trip through the heartland. In case you missed it, a number of people were upset that the President left his “real job” in Washington to ride through the middle of the U.S. on a new tricked out bus while conducting town hall meetings and visiting the Fair. To the President’s detractors, this was a blatantly political act designed to take the focus off of the two leading Republican presidential candidates, Congresswoman Michele Bachmann and Governor Rick Perry. Bachmann and Perry were also taking time away from their “real jobs” to ride through America’s heartland on tricked out buses attending town hall meetings and Fairs. The only apparent difference is that they were asking people to give them a new job while on the clock at their current job while the President was accused of asking people if he could keep his current job.

17 Aug, 2011

Let’s Be Honest About Dishonesty

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:53+00:00 August 17th, 2011|Accountability, Business Growth, Business Strategy, Corporate Culture, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Personal Development|

Dishonesty is not new, but let’s be honest—our society has raised the rationalization of dishonesty to an art form. When it comes to the truth, we embellish, expand, enrich, soften, shave, stretch, and withhold. We misspeak, pretend, bend, and improve. We are guilty of mistakes, misjudgment, and truthful hyperbole. We exaggerate, spin, filter, and inflate. However, we rarely—or perhaps even never—believe that we are guilty of dishonesty.

17 Aug, 2011

Leadership & The Tea Party

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:53+00:00 August 17th, 2011|Accountability, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Personal Development|

What’s not to like? Millions of like-minded people promoting limited federal government, individual freedoms, personal responsibility, free markets, and a return of political power to the states and the people. How could anyone argue that the Tea Party is a bad thing? Oh wait! That can’t be right. The Tea Party is actually millions of small-minded people who engage in racist behaviors and want to take away the power of the federal government to set policy and help society by cutting the funding to every social program that they don’t like. So which is it? The answer is, “It depends on your point of view.”

8 Aug, 2011

Why Geithner Must Go

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:54+00:00 August 8th, 2011|Accountability, Business Strategy, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Results|

Timothy Geithner must go for two reasons: (1) he’s expendable: and (2) he has become a distraction. Geithner didn’t vote on a single debt proposal, and yet he played a significant role in the crisis. This is what happens when coaches are fired. The coach isn’t on the field making the plays, and you would think that players would be committed enough to play hard for the common good. But when you can’t fire the team, you often fire the coach. You can’t fire an elected official, and the public and financial markets want someone held accountable. It is unfortunate and perhaps even a little unfair. Sorry Tim, you need to go.