Government & Politics

/Government & Politics
23 Jul, 2016

Who Changed?

By | 2016-10-29T15:28:59+00:00 July 23rd, 2016|Government & Politics, Leadership|

Something or more likely someone has changed over the past 20 years. Way back in the mid-1990’s I offered a development program titled Integrity-Driven® Leadership. One of the exercises asked participants to list leaders they [...]

10 Aug, 2014

What is the ONE thing you would do to fix the economy?

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:25+00:00 August 10th, 2014|Accountability, Business Growth, Business Strategy, Five Friends, Government & Politics, Innovation, Leadership, Leading & Managing Change, Results|

Five award-winning authors and speakers who just happen to be great friends get together to address important questions facing business, the country, and individual success. They answer this question in this edition: What ONE thing would you do to fix the economy? Be ready to be challenged.

17 Jun, 2014

The Fault in Our Institutions is the Fault Within Ourselves

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:28+00:00 June 17th, 2014|Accountability, Business Growth, Business Strategy, Corporate Culture, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Leading & Managing Change, Results|

The lack of confidence in the institutions that define our collective culture is threatening the civility, economic prosperity, and standing of the United States as a world leader. Let’s start with the government. The President’s [...]

12 Jun, 2014

Is It Always Right to Be Right?

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:28+00:00 June 12th, 2014|Accountability, Corporate Culture, Government & Politics, Integrity & Ethics, Leadership, Leading & Managing Change|

The 1971 Oscar in the Short Film, Cartoon category went to a piece titled “Is It Always Right To Be Right.” It was directed by Lee Mishkin, narrated by Orson Welles, and written by Warren Schmidt. The opening words of the film are: There once was a land where people were always right. They knew they were right and they were proud of it. It was a land where people stated with confidence, "I am right and you are wrong." These were words of conviction, courage, strength, and moral certainty. In this fictional land, any attempt at cooperation and understanding were viewed as cowardice and weakness. Everyone was so convinced of their rightness that no one dared to utter words such as, “You may be right” or “I may be wrong.”

15 Apr, 2014

Why Responsive Government is an Oxymoron … and Why Your Elected Officials are to Blame

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:31+00:00 April 15th, 2014|Accountability, Government & Politics, Innovation, Leadership, Leading & Managing Change, Results|

The government we want is nimble, flexible, and responsive. The government we experience, in many cases, is slow, cumbersome, and totally unresponsive. Let’s put this another way: We want our government to operate like our favorite business. We believe, in contrast, that our government is the poster child for lumbering bureaucratic inefficiency and employees who are out of touch with the realities of the marketplace. Twenty plus years of working with private and public sector organizations has taught me that the truth is actually somewhere between the two extremes.

24 Feb, 2014

What Political Races Can Teach Us About Standing Out in Our Marketplace

By | 2016-10-29T15:29:36+00:00 February 24th, 2014|Business Growth, Business Strategy, Communication, Government & Politics, Leadership, Leading & Managing Change|

Who do you choose when there is very little difference between the choices? Do you take the time to understand the small factors that might distinguish one choice from another, or do you go with what is easy or the name that you hear the most often? There are four individuals running to represent their party for the office of state representative in the area where I live. All four seem like nice people, and all four are virtually indistinguishable in their stance on the issues. Seriously, you could copy and paste any of their individual responses onto the web site for any of their competitors, and no one would notice.